Cloudy Day Emma Lake
Cloudy Day Emma Lake

Oil on canvas

11" x 14"

1998

Artist Collection

 

"En Plein Air" is a term borrowed from the French meaning "open (in full) air".  It is used to describe outdoor painting from observation.  

Traditionally, artists used oil  paints which take a long time to dry. The advent of acrylic paint challenged this method as these paints harden quickly.  On the prairies we also have harsh weather conditions, mosquitoes, wind, and a very short season to paint comfortably outdoors.  

I painted en plein air using oils at Emma Lake, Saskatchewan and the Qu'Appelle Valley, watercolour at Northern lakes, pen, ink and watercolour in the Bahamas. Personal comfort aside, I find painting outdoors rewarding as the constraints force spontaneity, quick strokes and immediate response to the light.  The outcome is usually fresh and worth the effort.

The Impressionists of the 19th C and Canada's Group of Seven were avid en plein air painters.  

Northern Cabin
Northern Cabin

Watercolour on paper

12" x 16"

1998

Artist Collection

Forest Floor, Emma Lake
Forest Floor, Emma Lake

Oil on canvas

24" x 30"

Private Collection

Summer's Day
Summer's Day

Watercolour on paper

18" x 24"

1995

Saskatchewan Power

Harbour Breeze, Bahamas
Harbour Breeze, Bahamas

Pen, ink, watercolour

8" x 11"

2007

Private  Collection

Anchor Bar, Bahamas
Anchor Bar, Bahamas

Pen, ink, watercolour on paper

11" x 16", 2007

Private Collection

Echo Lake South Shore
Echo Lake South Shore

Oil on Wood

10" x 16"

1998

Artist Collection

Summer on Echo Lake
Summer on Echo Lake

Oil on canvas

24" x 30"

1998

Artist Collection 

Summer's Day
Summer's Day

Oil on wood

6" x 12"

1998

Artist Collection

Cloudy Day Emma Lake
Northern Cabin
Forest Floor, Emma Lake
Summer's Day
Harbour Breeze, Bahamas
Anchor Bar, Bahamas
Echo Lake South Shore
Summer on Echo Lake
Summer's Day
Cloudy Day Emma Lake

Oil on canvas

11" x 14"

1998

Artist Collection

 

"En Plein Air" is a term borrowed from the French meaning "open (in full) air".  It is used to describe outdoor painting from observation.  

Traditionally, artists used oil  paints which take a long time to dry. The advent of acrylic paint challenged this method as these paints harden quickly.  On the prairies we also have harsh weather conditions, mosquitoes, wind, and a very short season to paint comfortably outdoors.  

I painted en plein air using oils at Emma Lake, Saskatchewan and the Qu'Appelle Valley, watercolour at Northern lakes, pen, ink and watercolour in the Bahamas. Personal comfort aside, I find painting outdoors rewarding as the constraints force spontaneity, quick strokes and immediate response to the light.  The outcome is usually fresh and worth the effort.

The Impressionists of the 19th C and Canada's Group of Seven were avid en plein air painters.  

Northern Cabin

Watercolour on paper

12" x 16"

1998

Artist Collection

Forest Floor, Emma Lake

Oil on canvas

24" x 30"

Private Collection

Summer's Day

Watercolour on paper

18" x 24"

1995

Saskatchewan Power

Harbour Breeze, Bahamas

Pen, ink, watercolour

8" x 11"

2007

Private  Collection

Anchor Bar, Bahamas

Pen, ink, watercolour on paper

11" x 16", 2007

Private Collection

Echo Lake South Shore

Oil on Wood

10" x 16"

1998

Artist Collection

Summer on Echo Lake

Oil on canvas

24" x 30"

1998

Artist Collection 

Summer's Day

Oil on wood

6" x 12"

1998

Artist Collection

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